Articles Posted in Near Drowning

Published on:

Florida cities, including Panama City, Daytona Beach, Clearwater Beach, St. Pete Beach, Fort Myers, Fort Lauderdale, South Beach – Miami, and Key West, are major destinations for spring breakers and tourists looking for warm sunshine and fun.

Whether by car or by air, hundreds of thousands of people flock to Florida each year to visit its miles of white sandy beaches, theme parks, restaurants, and bars. Some schools and colleges start spring break as early as the last week in February, and it runs through the end of March. According to TripSmarter.com, the two busiest weeks are March 10-17 and March 17-21.

Some common spring break dangers include:

Published on:

Cruise ships are a popular method of vacationing. From 2005 to 2010, about 100 million passengers took cruises according to the Cruise Lines International Association. Annually almost 12 million passengers embarked on cruises worldwide. In South Florida alone, there are more than 8 million visitors to Florida’s seaports (Port of Palm Beach, Port Everglades, Port of Miami).

Each year thousands of passengers are injured on cruise ships. Many believe cruise ship injuries and cruise ship deaths were underreported, and until recently, cruise lines were not required to report incidents in a timely, meaningful way. In 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act, which requires cruise lines to report all deaths, missing persons, theft, sexual harassment and assaults.

While the cruise line and cruise ship industry have a duty of care to guard against accidents and injury, some of the common injuries can include: slip and fall accidents, falling overboard, pool or recreational area accidents and drowning (scuba diving and snorkeling), medical staff negligence, food poisoning, Norwalk virus (norovirus), legionnaires disease, assault or battery by crew or passengers due to negligent security, sexual assault by passengers or crew, wrongful death due to cruise negligence, injuries arising from a cruise line-approved excursion and employee injuries (boiler room and engine room explosions).

Published on:

Miami, Florida – Drowning is the number one cause of death among children in Miami-Dade County. With Summer approaching, more children will be in or near swimming pools, at beaches, water parks and lakes. This increased exposure to water coincides with an increase in the number of drownings. For this reason, it is extremely important that children are taught about water safety.

The Miami-Dade Fire Department has responded to 199 drownings since January 2007. Most of those involved children under 16 years old and 32% involved children under 5 years old. In Miami, most drowning incidents occur between 11:00am and 6:00pm peaking between 3:00pm and 4:00pm. The majority of Miami drownings and near drownings occur in the Summer months from May through August. MDFR has already responded to 11 drowning incidents just since January of 2009.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue has prepared the following list of Summer Safety Tips to help keep our children safe:

• Always think of the ocean, lakes and your pool as dangerous places.
• Always directly supervise children when they are in a pool or around any body of water. Young children can drown in just a few inches of standing water. Bathtubs and large buckets also pose a threat. Most childhood drownings occur without an adult immediately present.
• Keep a phone at poolside so you don’t have to leave the kids to answer the phone and so you can call 9-1-1 immediately in case of an emergency.
• Never assume that swimming lessons or flotation devices can completely protect a child from drowning. Don’t have a false sense of security!
• Install alarms on all doors that lead into a pool area so you will know if a door to the pool has been opened.
• Secure long hair to the head, braid it, or cover it with a cap. Long hair can get suctioned into defective pool drains and vacuum lines.
• Make sure that all family members learn how to swim and what to do if they see someone in trouble in the water.
• Have your family members learn CPR. Drowning victims have a better chance of surviving if they get assistance right away.
• Know and comply with the Florida and Miami-Dade County statutes for pool fencing and pool safety. Pool fencing has been proven to save the lives of many children.
Continue reading →

Published on:

Tampa, Florida – A Florida Medical Malpractice Lawyer filed a lawsuit against University Community Hospital in Carrollwood for malpractice last month. The circumstances surrounding this case are anything but typical.

Robin Lumley, childless arrived at the hospital’s emergency room 2 1/2 years ago complaining of terrible pain in her abdomen.

ER nurses documented her complaints and a doctor ordered tests. Lumley asked to use the restroom and the hospital staff let her go.

A short time later, the hospital’s medical staff found that she had delivered a baby girl into the toilet.

The lawsuit alleges that Lumley, 46, didn’t know she was pregnant.

Lumley’s lawyer, however, claims the medical staff should have. Because they failed to recognize obvious signs and symptoms of labor, he says, Lumley’s baby nearly drowned.

The lawyer sued the hospital contending that baby Brianna Rose Lumley went into respiratory arrest which resulted in hypoxic brain damage due to the near drowning and sub-standard medical treatment.

According to the lawyer, the law suit was filed on the child’s behalf, not the mother’s. If it is successful, Robin Lumley won’t get a dime. All of the money recovered in the Florida medical malpractice case would be allocated to pay for the baby’s medical care.

The hospital refused to comment on the pending litigation.

According to caregivers, baby Brianna is just starting to speak and while she has had physical therapy to strengthen her limbs, she will likely face more physical and cognitive challenges.

The lawsuit also alleges that a doctor ordered a pregnancy test, but that test was never performed.

While near drowning incidents rarely occur in a hospital, the consequences are almost always tragic. Hypoxic brain damage – caused by partial deprivation of oxygen to the brain, and anoxic brain damage – caused by total deprivation of oxygen to the brain, are common problems following a near drowning. This type of brain injury is also commonly the result of malpractice. See my earlier post “Miami, Florida – Brain Damage Due To Cerebral Anoxia / Hypoxia Can Result From Medical Malpractice“.

Although this particular occurrence may be unusual in the hospital setting, medical malpractice is not. Unfortunately, many families suffer as a result of Florida medical malpractice.
Continue reading →